Diane Pacitti

Diane Pacitti (1948, London) worked as a Co-ordinator of community education and became a literature tutor after gaining an M.Phil. at Nottingham University.

Her writing explores migration, identity, and power relationships.

In 2004, she combined her poems with the drawings of her husband Antonio Pacitti in the publication Guantanamo, described by the Nobel Laureate Harold Pinter as ‘deeply impressive and very important.’

Her poetry has been published in Third Way and In Memoriam, been shortlisted for the Jane Martin poetry prize at Girton College and was awarded first prize for Poetry by the Bronte Society in 2014.

Since Antonio Pacitti’s death in 2009, Diane Pacitti has curated and presented his artworks within a variety of narratives and situations, working with creative partners including Glasgow University Memorial Chapel, Cultural Documents (Cerasuolo, Italy), Bradford Cathedral and others.

Between Two States is her first novel.

Antonio Pacitti (1924 - 2003) Molise Landscape Monotype 2005 © Diane Pacitti Gifted to the Community of Cerasuolo by Diane Pacitti on the occasion of the exhibition of works by Antonio Pacitti at the Museo Borgo Rosso, 2015

Antonio Pacitti (1924 – 2003)
Molise Landscape
Monotype
2005
© Diane Pacitti
Gifted to the Community of Cerasuolo by Diane Pacitti on the occasion of the exhibition of works by Antonio Pacitti at the Museo Borgo Rosso, 2015

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exploring Lorne through art processes: The Well at the World’s End:

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Recent Stories

Sur le Herbe (homage a Dominico and Vincenzo Mancini), 2011

Sur le Herbe (homage a Dominico and Vincenzo Mancini), 2011

Postcard and seed package made for the Garden Marathon, Serpentine Gallery London 2011; seeds from the towns of Picinisco and … more


Third Culture Kid

The term Third Culture Kid is becoming an increasingly important focus for developing Cultural Documents. This term was first identified … more